Archive for the ‘Wood’ Category

Viking Sunset tap handle

Tuesday, July 25th, 2017

Our friend and teacher, Nick Agar (turningintoart.com), is now selling a kit of supplies to make his signature style of Viking sunset bowls.

I have used the colors and metallic finish on this tap handle for that bartender who likes a full-bodied beer in the swashbuckling Viking style.  Yes, I know, they drank mead, but I think it must be a somewhat heavy version of a honey wheat lager….

When a box is not a cube

Saturday, May 20th, 2017

When a woodturner speaks of a box, she means a small cylindrical lidded form with a tight-fitting lid.  For this series, I use buttons as knobs.

The box on the left is in the style of Warren MacKenzie’s boxes, with two (clay) buttons to line up the lid with the base.  His, however, are thwacked into five-sided boxes.  I could do something similar with the sander, just not this time.

All of the button boxes will include an assortment of buttons when I get ready to sell them.

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Best when handmade

Saturday, May 20th, 2017

Lace bobbins work best when each one is distinctive, so that the lacemaker can identify the order of placement of the threads.  This suits me very well, because I have lots of different woods, beads, and styles of turning to use!

Sadly, bobbin lace is a skill endangered by our short attention spans.  It requires ‘prickings’ to guide the process, a pillow to work upon, and beautiful lacemaking threads.  Perhaps it will experience a revival for jewelry or wire art, as macrame has in recent years.

Wood and Fabric — what better combination?

Tuesday, July 19th, 2016

My Aunt Jo had a collection of small ladies’ footstools before 1960.  This is my ‘revival’ of that memory.   It’s not exactly ‘mid-century,’ but the square shape gives a nice energy to the piece.

Dennis Liggett turned the cherry legs.  The frame uses pockethole joinery, learned from Greg Paige at Paige Woodwoorking in Union Star, Missouri.

I chose a bold upholstery fabric and a 2″ cushion for this 10 x 10″ square footstool.  I am working on more styles and sizes of tops, including one to display a single quilt block.  We will also sell these ready-to-cover for needleworkers.  We will have several ready for the September Studio Tour and our fall selling season.

Thanks, Northwoods Figured Wood!

Sunday, July 10th, 2016

In September 2015, Dennis and I had a booth at the Rocky Mtn Woodturners Symposium in Loveland, CO, right next to Northwest Figured Woods.  It was impossible to resist their beautiful maple burls.  The little bowl in their July 9th newsletter is made from some of the wood I bought from them.

When I go to woodturner heaven, I will only turn maple burls.  I hope that heaven is one of their customers, too.

a writing instrument…

Saturday, April 30th, 2016

For a lot of woodturners, pens are their introduction to the craft.

I have made up a few from kits, but it seemed like 90% fussing with assembly, and 10% working on the lathe.  Our Club president challenged all of us to bring a writing instrument to the May meeting, so I looked for a way to reverse those percentages.  I found ‘stick pens’ that use the guts from a Bic pen.  This definitely keeps the parts budget low, and the user can replace the ink cartridge any time with another Bic pen’s parts.

The first challenge is to find a drill bit long enough.  Luckily, Dennis Liggett always has the tool that I need for the job.  This time, he even drilled the holes.

These three are made from osage orange (‘hedge’ to a mid-westerner).  It is a straight, fine-grained wood for turning.  Some of the beautiful color mellows to a brown over time.  Nature’s improvement on plastics, and now, mine, too.

…a notion to revive a tradition

Tuesday, March 22nd, 2016

Woodturners have been making fruit for over a hundred years, but we don’t see much of it in the US.  When we went to England, the turners made collections of fruit in different kinds of exotic wood scraps.  That way, the bowl was like  a memory palace for their work.

I’ve been experimenting with different color methods–fabric paint, fabric dye, acrylics, and milk paints.  Here’s a snapshot of my progress so far.  The pomegranate took a bit of carving, too.

New work for 2016 selling season

Saturday, March 19th, 2016

These Clock Blocks will be our feature item for the Kay & Dennis Studio Tour in September.  They start as circular designs made on the wood lathe and airbrushed with color. The big piece is then cut into squares.   We add zentangles®, bronze paint, and the clock insert.

The blocks are a terrific desk accessory that can be rearranged, or decorated further with upholstery nails, stickers, or drawings on the ‘plain’ sides.

When you are a quilter…

Thursday, October 22nd, 2015

….everything looks like a quilt.

This wall sculpture started in a class with Nick Agar (turningintoart.com) at Craft Supplies in Provo, Utah.

I was frustrated by the scale of the original turning.  Most of my surface design methods were too detailed in the early stages.  It turns out that I don’t have a good sense of what the carvers call ‘modelling’ for 3D effects on a 2D surface.  So the only solution for me was to divide, and divide again, until the scale of the work seemed right.

Nine-patch is a common way that quilters divide space.

Sometimes you just have to keep going…

Thursday, October 22nd, 2015

Of the blocks left over from the 9-patch composition, I found these four for a smaller piece.  They had quite a bit of bare wood.  For the 2 5/8″ squares, zentangles in ink were just about the right level of detail.

I chose the composition for both of the wooden quilts.  Next time, I won’t create a fixed design.  While I was working on them, visitors to the studio really enjoyed playing with the blocks.  If adults can rediscover coloring books, blocks must be the next big thing.

–hard maple, 11″ square at the first turning; divided into 4, each turned again and then divided into fourths, for 16 blocks total to make up the two ‘quilts.’