the domestic side of space travel…

Like an embroidery sampler, this small quilt has a domestic feeling, with the three odd moons to place it in the interstellar series.  The row of white dots across the landscape add another technical element just beyond our usual sense of tin-can space structures.  No guns in sight.  Just ‘Home Sweet Colony.’

cottons in space

Scraps of marbled cotton in this 12 x 12″ quilt reflect some of the swirling of nebulae in recent space photography.  Without silk, it is hard to create the luminosity of nearby stars and planets.  These are acrylic paints with the ‘Starry Starry Night’ title printed on the front of the quilt.

Interstellar silk

‘Distant Planet is the second of the Interstellar quilts.  Dyed silk combines with commercial cottons and machine quilting to evoke an unfamiliar sky.  The shape of the quilt and the green silk reflect the quadrilaterals used extensively in Star Wars.

Photography from space exploration and science fiction blend freely in my first efforts.  As I make more fabrics for this series of quilts, I hope to find the quilt-like features of space exploration that we tend to overlook.  Most habitations, for example, come from archaeology or submarine design, and feature weapons as the most common human artifacts.  It will be good to nurture a different vision…

New tools for the New Year

…a new commercial stencil (lower left) used on silk with Montana spray paint, Chroma-craft brushed on a blue background, and pentel dye sticks over a rosy dyed silk charmeuse.

I’m looking for overall patterns to use with more quilts in the Interstellar series.

Pinterest provides a new index for my work!

The SAQA newsletter suggested using Pinterest to build a portfolio of work.  Great update to the WordPress categories that I’ve been building with the blog.  Look for Kay Liggett in the search bar.

I have discovered that my work is theme-related across all three media–clay, wood, and fabric.  Pinning is a great way to see correlations quickly.

Great weekend in Palmer Lake

I enjoyed seeing old friends and making some new ones at the Palmer Lake Craft Fair September 30-October 1st.   Customers were very thoughtful and observant, in spite of the distractions of the show in Palmer Lake’s rickety old Town Hall. Lots of my work now consists of revivals of old products from the long history of craft.    They seem particularly appealing in a setting which has no electronic beeps!  One gentleman commented that we vendors were all like the 60’s come back to life.  Maybe some of us never really left the Summer of Love, and now we expect something really special for the Autumn…

Interstellar Ornaments for 2016

After the surprise of the blue pears, I took a more hopeful look at using blue colors on wood.

Generally, we get the best results with the warm colors on wooden objects.  However, this amazingly deep blue matte paint combines so well with silver highlights that I have indulged extensively on these ornaments.  (2.5 -3″ tall, Colorado Aspen)

The only drawback to these ornaments is that they may require a silvery tree, or maybe some very blue lights on a green one.  I am looking forward to seeing how the colors respond to the LED Christmas lights.  I have always thought the LED colors were somewhat cold.  Like outer space.  Like interstellar space….

Save

Blue – so natural, so not

I was inspired by Merryl Saylan to use milk paint on wooden fruits.  It is a self-priming paint that can be applied in layers and cut back with sanding.

Federal Blue was not on my list of likely colors for pears.  These have a blue base, with some blue mixed with buttermilk sponged on top.  Amazingly, the blue and yellow paints did not combine to form green.  I liked the frosty feeling, so I used a pewter metallic paint for the stems.

Thanks to Merryl for the suggestion, and to Ben at Woodcraft for giving me a sample of Federal Blue traditional milk paint!

Wood and Fabric — what better combination?

My Aunt Jo had a collection of small ladies’ footstools before 1960.  This is my ‘revival’ of that memory.   It’s not exactly ‘mid-century,’ but the square shape gives a nice energy to the piece.

Dennis Liggett turned the cherry legs.  The frame uses pockethole joinery, learned from Greg Paige at Paige Woodwoorking in Union Star, Missouri.

I chose a bold upholstery fabric and a 2″ cushion for this 10 x 10″ square footstool.  I am working on more styles and sizes of tops, including one to display a single quilt block.  We will also sell these ready-to-cover for needleworkers.  We will have several ready for the September Studio Tour and our fall selling season.

Thanks, Northwoods Figured Wood!

In September 2015, Dennis and I had a booth at the Rocky Mtn Woodturners Symposium in Loveland, CO, right next to Northwest Figured Woods.  It was impossible to resist their beautiful maple burls.  The little bowl in their July 9th newsletter is made from some of the wood I bought from them.

When I go to woodturner heaven, I will only turn maple burls.  I hope that heaven is one of their customers, too.