When a box is not a cube

When a woodturner speaks of a box, she means a small cylindrical lidded form with a tight-fitting lid.  For this series, I use buttons as knobs.

The box on the left is in the style of Warren MacKenzie’s boxes, with two (clay) buttons to line up the lid with the base.  His, however, are thwacked into five-sided boxes.  I could do something similar with the sander, just not this time.

All of the button boxes will include an assortment of buttons when I get ready to sell them.

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Best when handmade

Lace bobbins work best when each one is distinctive, so that the lacemaker can identify the order of placement of the threads.  This suits me very well, because I have lots of different woods, beads, and styles of turning to use!

Sadly, bobbin lace is a skill endangered by our short attention spans.  It requires ‘prickings’ to guide the process, a pillow to work upon, and beautiful lacemaking threads.  Perhaps it will experience a revival for jewelry or wire art, as macrame has in recent years.

A Twist for my Tower Blocks

Continuing my interest in making towers with cupolas, I set up a Pinterest board (Cupolas, turnips, onions-Kay Liggett) to collect inspirational images.  This one is all turned wood, with various finish options, free-hand pyrography, and gilders paste.  The block of green twistwork is a simple 3-start twist.  11.5″ tall

A special thanks to Austrian artist Hundertwasser, for inspiring some brighter colors, and to global wood artist Nick Agar for teaching me how to apply different colors to wood.

Remember Earth

In honor of February’s ‘Snow Moon,’ I made this quilt with hand-painted silks and a commercial batik fabric.  It is meant to create nostalgia in space travellers for what they left behind.  Of course, they see the heavens with the colors of their own experiences, which is not exactly the more black-and-white way that we think of the Milky Way from high in the mountains of Colorado.  Thanks to the Hubble telescope, we know that those colors are out there…

the domestic side of space travel…

Like an embroidery sampler, this small quilt has a domestic feeling, with the three odd moons to place it in the interstellar series.  The row of white dots across the landscape add another technical element just beyond our usual sense of tin-can space structures.  No guns in sight.  Just ‘Home Sweet Colony.’

cottons in space

Scraps of marbled cotton in this 12 x 12″ quilt reflect some of the swirling of nebulae in recent space photography.  Without silk, it is hard to create the luminosity of nearby stars and planets.  These are acrylic paints with the ‘Starry Starry Night’ title printed on the front of the quilt.

Interstellar silk

‘Distant Planet is the second of the Interstellar quilts.  Dyed silk combines with commercial cottons and machine quilting to evoke an unfamiliar sky.  The shape of the quilt and the green silk reflect the quadrilaterals used extensively in Star Wars.

Photography from space exploration and science fiction blend freely in my first efforts.  As I make more fabrics for this series of quilts, I hope to find the quilt-like features of space exploration that we tend to overlook.  Most habitations, for example, come from archaeology or submarine design, and feature weapons as the most common human artifacts.  It will be good to nurture a different vision…

New tools for the New Year

…a new commercial stencil (lower left) used on silk with Montana spray paint, Chroma-craft brushed on a blue background, and pentel dye sticks over a rosy dyed silk charmeuse.

I’m looking for overall patterns to use with more quilts in the Interstellar series.

Pinterest provides a new index for my work!

The SAQA newsletter suggested using Pinterest to build a portfolio of work.  Great update to the WordPress categories that I’ve been building with the blog.  Look for Kay Liggett in the search bar.

I have discovered that my work is theme-related across all three media–clay, wood, and fabric.  Pinning is a great way to see correlations quickly.

Great weekend in Palmer Lake

I enjoyed seeing old friends and making some new ones at the Palmer Lake Craft Fair September 30-October 1st.   Customers were very thoughtful and observant, in spite of the distractions of the show in Palmer Lake’s rickety old Town Hall. Lots of my work now consists of revivals of old products from the long history of craft.    They seem particularly appealing in a setting which has no electronic beeps!  One gentleman commented that we vendors were all like the 60’s come back to life.  Maybe some of us never really left the Summer of Love, and now we expect something really special for the Autumn…